Christian Coleman wins 100m gold, gets one step closer to being crowned the fastest man on earth

first_img Associated Press DohaSeptember 29, 2019UPDATED: September 29, 2019 09:03 IST Christian Coleman (c) crosses the finish line to win the men’s 100 meter race ahead of Justin Gatlin (r) (AP)HIGHLIGHTSDefending champion Justin Gatlin finished with a silver and 0.13 seconds behind Christian ColemanCanada’s Andre De Grasse claimed bronze in 9.90 secondsColeman never trailed his opponents during the entire raceEveryone knew exactly where to find Christian Coleman this time.The sprinter who faced a suspension because he couldn’t be located for drug testing burst out of the blocks Saturday night and powered to the early lead in track’s marquee event.He got stronger from there, blowing away the seven other entrants in the 100-meter world championship title race and leaving little doubt about who will be chased, and who will do the chasing, in a reworked track landscape without the retired Usain Bolt.Coleman’s time, 9.76 seconds, might not have turned many heads, but this should: He beat Justin Gatlin to the line by 0.13 seconds – an entire body length. That marked the biggest blowout in a 100-meter race at worlds or the Olympics since 2011.”This is something I’ll never take for granted,” Coleman said. “The opportunity to come out here and compete. And then to be crowned world champion?”But Coleman’s breakout night had few similarities to any that Bolt dominated over his 10 years of record-setting, reggae-fueled fun.Even on the races everyone knew he’d win, Bolt brought the entertainment and some drama taking forever to unfurl his 6-foot-5 frame from the blocks, then working the first 50 meters to grab the lead, then leaving everyone hanging at the end to see what that clock might say.Coleman, on the other hand, never trailed the legs on his muscle-bound, 5-9 frame pumping like pistons from start to finish.The differences on the second evening at the air-conditioned track in Doha weren’t restricted to the men’s 100.advertisementEarlier, Jamaica earned its first gold medal of the championship. Not in its traditional sprints, but in the long jump, courtesy of Tajay Gayle, who won the country’s first world championship medal in a field event.The Netherlands, home of speed skating and sprinter Dafne Schippers, took home its first 10,000-meter gold on the shoes of Ethiopian-born Sifan Hassan, who is making a smooth transition from middle distance to the long races.And the United States found a surprising, maybe shocking, gold medal in one of the very few spots it hasn’t dominated at some point in track and field’s long history women’s hammer throw. It came courtesy of a softball player-turned-throwing star named DeAnna Price whose first experience hurling that big piece of metal resulted in her getting bonked in the head.”I remember literally dropping it and saying, ‘I’m never doing this again,'” she said.Could anyone have blamed Coleman for thinking the same five weeks ago when his name started showing up in the headlines?The leak of information about his troubles with the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency opened up a spigot of allegations and recriminations that followed him to Doha and could stay with him on the road to next year’s Tokyo Olympics.”It’s pretty disturbing to know people out there say things and they don’t know me personally at all,” Coleman said. “But at this point, I’m over it.”His case involved three “whereabouts failures” that occurred between June 6, 2018, and April 26, 2019. Three failures in a 12-month span can trigger an anti-doping violation.But the rules are technical, and there’s a difference between not being where you say you’re going to be and simply failing to update the app that tells authorities where you can be found. Because of those details, Coleman’s first violation was backdated to April 1, 2018, the start of the three-month period at which the original information is supposed to be inputted. That took his first violation out of the 12-month window and compelled USADA to drop the case.It allowed Coleman to race here in Doha, but couldn’t strip away the words “Coleman” and “Doping” that appeared in headlines worldwide.Coleman, who has been subject to more than 20 doping tests over the past two years and never been hit with a positive, posted a long YouTube video to explain the situation. He came to Doha thinking that would calm things down. It hasn’t, and at this point with the 200-meter qualifying starting Sunday and relays on his plate later next week he’s done trying.”I’m not spending much time trying to explain things to people who aren’t interested in the truth,” he said.Best, perhaps, to let his running do the talking.With Tokyo a mere 10 months away, Gatlin, who came in as defending champion, bronze medalist Andre De Grasse and Yohan Blake of Jamaica found out just how much room they have to make up.When did Coleman know he had it wrapped up?”From the start,” he said. “I got up on top of everybody. … I knew that if I was being patient, the end would take care of itself.”advertisementAt the end, Coleman let out a primal scream, then pounded his chest twice and jogged a half-circle around the track, shouting into the stands. He blew a couple of kisses toward the heavens and kneeled for a brief second.The half-full, 40,000-seat stadium was emptying. It was a far cry from the Bolt celebrations, all infused with reggae music, Jamaican flags, plenty of preening, picture-taking and the bow-and-arrow pose.”There are so many people doing really good things right now,” Coleman said. “Everyone should be celebrated. It doesn’t have to be one face. I’m happy to part of that group.”Fair enough. But on the first big night of track without Bolt, Coleman found himself separated from that group, not running with it.Also Read | World Athletics Championships: India in 4x400m mixed relay final, secure Olympic berthAlso Read | World Athletics Championships: Dutee Chand fails to reach 100m semis, misses Olympic quotaFor sports news, updates, live scores and cricket fixtures, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for Sports news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byAjay Tiwari Tags :Follow Christian ColemanFollow Justin GatlinFollow IAAF World Athletics Championships Next Christian Coleman wins 100m gold, gets one step closer to being crowned the fastest man on earth23-year-old American Christian Coleman stamped his authority on the ongoing IAAF World Athletics Championships by winning the coveted 100m title in a personal best time of 9.76 seconds.advertisementlast_img read more


Grammar school girls accuse teachers of sexualising them for banning short sleeves

first_imgSimon Langton Girl's Grammar School  Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Simon Langton Girl’s Grammar School  She added: “I speak for myself and many others when I say we aren’t trying to ‘flaunt’ anything.”Nudity shouldn’t be sexualised, I’m not sure what I’ve got and I’m not trying to flaunt it to anybody, I just want to feel comfortable in a school environment.”Head teacher Dr Matthew Baxter, who is head of the Simon Langton Boy’s school as well as the sister school, said: “The subject was discussed with the deputy heads and it has been decided that both Langton schools will ensure that the same dress code applies to all students within their sixth form.” Students at a top girls’ grammar schoolhave accused teachers of “sexualising” them for banning short sleeves in hot weather.The girls have launched a petition to end “oppressive and demeaning” uniform rules which ban students from wearing strappy or sleeveless tops or revealing their shoulders.Sixth form pupils at Simon Langton Girl’s Grammar School are rallying to get teachers to overturn rules restricting the type of tops they can wear, arguing they were not trying to “flaunt anything”.More than 130 people have backed the online campaign, which was launched as temperatures soared into the high twenties this week as the country basks in a heatwave. Simon Langton Girl’s Grammar School center_img Simon Langton Girl's Grammar School  Writing on a public school forum, a pupil who launched the campaign cited feminist critic Laura Mulvey and said women were only forced to cover up due to the oppressive male gaze.She wrote: “I understand that the rules in place are somewhat important, but I am not arguing that bikini tops or very short shorts should be allowed.”The only reason that ‘boobs and bum cheeks’ are deemed inappropriate for school is because of oppression women have received from the male gaze over the years.” “It is our job to change the oppressive and demeaning standards that women are forced to abide by, or nothing will change in the future.”One student, year 12 pupil Ania Franzcuk, told Mail Online: “I don’t think that any clothing changes will affect pupils work. Whatever they wear they are going to work it is not going to make any difference. “The clothing that we wear at the girls school and the individuality it shows is really good for our school. “But if you are not comfortable you are not going to be able to work well.”Pupils at the selective grammar in Canterbury, Kent, are permitted to wear their own clothes in Years 12 and 13 but must abide by a strict dress code. The students want the school, founded in 1881 and with 1,025 girls aged 11 to 18, to reconsider their policy arguing they should be able to feel “comfortable” in a school environment.The petition reads: “Many of the students in the SLGGS sixth form have disagreed with the dress code rule that states girls should not wear strappy or sleeveless tops that reveal shoulders.”This rule encourages the disturbing sexualisation of young girls’ bodies, most of which are underage.”The argument that shoulders shouldn’t be seen in a workplace is irrelevant, as our generation is the future workforce.last_img read more