We cannot have “zero suicides” if we allow euthanasia

first_imgThose who support assisted dying but not suicide must ask why they approve of a terminally-ill person taking her life when they take a zero tolerance approach to other suicides. The similarities are there. Most of the reasons put forward for allowing assisted death can be reasons for any suicide. If autonomy is important, why isn’t the autonomy of those without a terminal illness? Many if not most suicides reflect an attempt to end suffering, just as the Falconer Bill wishes to do in the terminally ill. The reasons why people take their lives under the US state of Oregon’s Death With Dignity Act, the model for Falconer’s bill,reflect existential issues around loss that can be felt by anyone – of autonomy, of enjoyment of life’s activities, of dignity. Pain didn’t make it into the top five. Many of the 4700 suicides Clegg referred probably took their lives because they, too, felt the remainder of their lives unbearable. The Telegraph 20 January 2015Nick Clegg wants to end suicide. At a mental health conference on Monday he called on every part of the NHS to help reduce the current rate of 4,700 people a year. “Suicide is, and always has been, a massive taboo in our society,” he told the audience. “People are genuinely scared to talk about it, never mind intervene when they believe a loved one is at risk.”In this he follows the World Health Organization, which has long pointed to suicide as an international problem. They point out that more than 800,000 people every year die by suicide worldwide. As the WHO noted in 2000: “Suicide should not be depicted as a method of coping with personal problems …Instead, the emphasis should be on mourning the person’s death.” If assisted dying is suicide, then the effect of the Falconer Bill is very clear. It will treble suicides amongst the terminally. Extrapolating from the example of Oregon, Dignity in Dying estimate that 1000 people per year will opt for ingesting poison if the Falconer Bill passes. But they estimate that there are currently about 330 suicides by terminally-ill people in Britain. Right now suicide is legal in Britain; with encouragement and assistance – who knows? – we might get the rate even higher.http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/assisted-dying/11357000/We-cannot-have-zero-suicides-if-we-allow-euthanasia.htmlcenter_img Yet the campaign against suicide throws up questions about assisted dying, which was debated in the House of Lords last week. Here we find another example of the “massive taboo” that people are scared to talk about. That is: isn’t assisted dying really suicide? How can we wage a war against suicide for some whilst encouraging it as a legitimate choice for others? Though the Lords voted down an amendment to Lord Falconer’s Assisted Dying bill that would have changed the term to “assisted suicide”, and though Dignity in Dying insists otherwise, it is difficult to argue that what is being proposed is not essentially suicide. Ingesting poison in a room with the intent to die does not magically become “assisted dying” if the poison is prescribed. Over the border in Scotland, the similar proposed legislation was called – less euphemistically – the “Assisted Suicide” bill.last_img read more


Vettel to leave Ferrari at end of 2020 F1 season

first_imgBy Alan BaldwinLONDON (Reuters) – Four-times Formula One world champion Sebastian Vettel will leave Ferrari at the end of the 2020 season, with the German facing an uncertain future in racing.The sport’s oldest, most glamorous and successful team announced the move in a statement on Tuesday after talks on a new contract ended without a deal.“This is a decision taken jointly by ourselves and Sebastian, one which both parties feel is for the best,” said Ferrari principal Mattia Binotto.“It was not an easy decision to reach, given Sebastian’s worth as a driver and as a person.”Vettel joined in 2015 with the dream of emulating boyhood hero and seven times champion Michael Schumacher in winning titles in the famous red cars.Where the 32-year-old will go, whether he will remain in a sport whose delayed season has yet to start, and who might replace him are the big questions now.“In order to get the best possible results in this sport, it’s vital for all parties to work in perfect harmony,” said Vettel. “The team and I have realised that there is no longer a common desire to stay together beyond the end of this season.“Financial matters have played no part in this joint decision. That’s not the way I think when it comes to making certain choices and it never will be.”“What’s been happening in these past few months has led many of us to reflect on what are our real priorities in life,” added the father of three, referring to the COVID-19 pandemic that has sent countries around the world into lockdown.Vettel said he would now take time “to reflect on what really matters when it comes to my future”.TIME TO SPLITGerman media, who flagged up the departure on Monday night, reported that he had rejected the terms being offered.They suggested Vettel, who won 14 races with the team and is their third-most successful driver, had been offered only a one-year extension with a salary reduction.Ferrari had said the German, who won his titles with Red Bull from 2010-13, was their first choice to partner Charles Leclerc in 2021.Binotto said there was no one reason for the split “apart from the common and amicable belief that the time had come to go our separate ways in order to reach our respective objectives”.Leclerc, who won two races last year and is only 22, has a contract until 2024 and is seen as the future of a team that last won a driver’s title with Kimi Raikkonen in 2007.The Monegasque outperformed Vettel last year in his first season at Ferrari, finishing ahead of him overall and taking more points, poles, podiums and wins.“It’s been a huge honour for me to be your team mate,” Leclerc said on Twitter.“We’ve had some tense moments on tracks, some very good ones and some others that didn’t end as we both wanted, but there was always respect, even though it wasn’t perceived this way from the outside.“I’ve never learnt so much as I did with you as my teammate. Thank you for everything Seb.”Australian Daniel Ricciardo, at Renault, and McLaren’s Spaniard Carlos Sainz have been installed as the leading candidates to take one of the most coveted seats on the grid.Six-times world champion Lewis Hamilton has also been linked with Ferrari but has repeatedly indicated he intends to stay with Mercedes.last_img read more


Beat writers predict winner in Syracuse-Florida State matchup

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on November 17, 2016 at 10:59 pm Syracuse (4-6, 2-4 Atlantic Coast) takes on No. 17 Florida State (7-3, 4-3) on Saturday at 3:30 p.m. The Orange faces Dalvin Cook, who is regarded as one of the best running backs in the country. Check out how our beat writers think the matchup will unfold.Tomer Langer (4-3)GutterballFlorida State 35, Syracuse 17A month ago, this seemed like an interesting game that Syracuse, although still an underdog, would have a chance in. Florida State was coming off an incredibly unconvincing 17-6 win to Wake Forest (after a one-point victory against Miami and a stretch where it lost two of its four games), and Syracuse was coming off its best regular season win in program history with a team flying high. That all came crashing down to earth with Eric Dungey’s injury against Clemson. With him unlikely to play, it’ll be hard for SU to compete in this game that pushes them almost completely out of bowl contention.Chris Libonati (8-2)Dalvin Cook-edFlorida State 34, Syracuse 13The last time I predicted the No. 17 team in the country to beat Syracuse, the Orange upset Virginia Tech. What do I know? I do think this is a bit different, though. Zaire Franklin called Dalvin Cook the best running back in the country and I agree. Deondre Francois has been solid. I just don’t think the SU defense will suppress the Florida State offense.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textJon Mettus (8-2)Early FeastFlorida State 43, Syracuse 13The No. 17 team in the country is coming to the Carrier Dome, but don’t expect fans to stream onto the field after the game like when SU topped Virginia Tech earlier this year. Syracuse is undersized, undermanned and overmatched. Dino Babers said he “hope(s)” SU can win. And that’s all it’ll be: a hope. Cook and company are just too good for a Zack Mahoney-led squad to knock off. Commentslast_img read more