PICTURE SPECIAL ON A SPECIAL NIGHT FOR JASON QUIGLEY AND HIS DONEGAL FANS

first_imgIT’S not every night you win your first Professional bout.But it was a dream start for Jason Quigley – and for his Donegal fans at the MGM Arena in Las Vegas.Here’s some more snaps to celebrate. PICTURE SPECIAL ON A SPECIAL NIGHT FOR JASON QUIGLEY AND HIS DONEGAL FANS was last modified: July 13th, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Jason QuigleyLas Vegaspicture speciallast_img read more


MY DONEGAL – WITH DANIEL O’DONNELL

first_imgMY DONEGAL: Daniel O’Donnell is one of Ireland’s most famous musicians and personalities and is currently participating in the hit BBC show Strictly Come Dancing.Daniel took time out of his busy schedule to tell us about everything he loves about Donegal. What is your favourite place in Donegal and Why?My favourite place in Donegal would probably have to be golfing on Cruit Island Golf Course. At every Tee there is a different view.You can see all the islands on the bay. I can’t say the golf is  always up to scratch but the views and the tranquillity are definitely worth going there for.If you could change one thing about Donegal what would it be? I think the only thing I would want to change is that more jobs were created so our young people didn’t have to move away.Who is the one person in Donegal you look up to and why?Mrs Logue who was my primary school teacher. She Always encouraged us to do our best and in my case she gave me the opportunity to sing periodically in class which in turn gave me great confidence to perform in public.Daniel O Donnell or Packie Bonner?I hope Packie is a better singer than I am a footballer.What has been Donegal’s proudest moment in recent years? I would have to say The Sam Maguire returning to Donegal in 2012 was quite special. The pride and joy that the whole team and Jim Mc Guinness brought into our county was fantastic.The excitement in Donegal town the night they returned was a night I won’t forget.What was Donegal’s saddest moment?In my time the saddest moments were the loss of life through fishing tragedies. What is your favourite Donegal made product? Magee Tweed. I recently bought a suit and I just love it, Magees has been on the go a long time and I love seeing it in shops when I’m away from home.I’m also delighted of the success of the Mc Garvery brothers from Loughanuire. It’s great to see these young lads with such initiative and the success they’ve achieved is fantastic.What is your favourite Donegal restaurant? I frequent many local restaurants in our area, to name one I would feel is an injustice to the others because I like them all for different reasons.Will Donegal win the All Ireland Next year?I’m sure Rory and the boys will try their best.What is your favourite Donegal food? It would have to be fresh Crab Claws or MusselsYour nomination for Donegal’s most stylish person? I don’t think you can touch Noel Cunningham in the style stakes.Is there anything that really annoys you about Donegal or its people? I love everything about Donegal and I think the one thing that reoccurs when I have conversations with fans who might visit the area is how friendly the people are and that makes me proud.If you had a million euro to spend on improving something in Donegal what would it be?I would love to see more places available for the elderly be it in Dungloe hospital or a designated nursing home.If this facility was available it would mean that the elderly people that can’t live at home would be able to remain in their own locality.Who is Donegal’s most successful businessperson in your opinion?Our current Donegal Person of the Year Moya Doherty. As the founder of river dance she has achieved tremendous success all over the worldWho is your favorite Donegal sports person?In 1990&1994 the country went crazy for the world cups, packie was one of the stars and we couldn’t have been prouder. The world’s best goalie was from the rosses.Donegal’s golden eagles or basking sharks?Don’t think I’ve seen either so I’ll go with Arranmore Island’s dolphins!MY DONEGAL – WITH DANIEL O’DONNELL was last modified: September 16th, 2015 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:daniel o’donnellEntertainmentFeaturesMY DONEGALnewslast_img read more


Missing Dog: Have you seen Sandy?

first_imgUPDATE: Sandy has come home safely, thanks to all who shared this post.An appeal has been launched to find a much-loved missing dog in Letterkenny. Sandy was last seen on Monday 11th March in the Ramelton Road/Ballyraine area of Letterkenny. She is 12 years old.Sandy’s owners are anxious to see her come back home safely.If anyone has any information please call Caitrina on 0861655232.Missing Dog Sandy – LetterkennyMissing Dog: Have you seen Sandy? was last modified: March 14th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:letterkennylost and foundMISSING DOGlast_img read more


Six reasons Hoddle is ideal for QPR

first_imgSee also:QPR look to Hoddle ahead of new seasonQPR confirm arrival of Hoddle as coachFormer Rangers players hail the arrival of ‘football genius’ HoddleHoddle laid foundations at Chelsea and could do the same at QPRQPR boss hoping to keep Hoddle No cut-price Taarabt deal, QPR boss insistsNo move for Song but QPR still want NikoQPR end interest in £10m-rated DeeneyHoddle working closely with QPR’s TraoreQPR boss hails ‘low maintenance’ IslaFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more


MacLeod gets more game time as Brentford youngsters beat Reading

first_imgLewis MacLeod continued to build up his match fitness as Brentford’s development squad beat Reading 2-1 in the Under-21 Premier League Cup.The former Glasgow Rangers midfielder was joined in the side by Yoann Barbet, Jan Holldack and Courtney Senior.Brentford went in front at Wycombe’s Adams Park on the half-hour mark, Jermaine Udumaga firing home from just outside the box.The Bees doubled the lead with 12 minutes remaining as substitute Herson Rodrigues Alves netted, with Reading pulling a goal back through Republic of Ireland Under-21 international Pierce Sweeney.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more


DNA Organization Is Fractal

first_imgHow would you pack spaghetti in a basketball (07/28/2004) such that you could get to any strand quickly?  You might try the “fractal globule” method.  You form little knots, or globules, on each strand.  These become like beads on a string.  Now you fold the beads into globules, and then fold those into higher-level globules.  A simple operation makes any spot in super-globule accessible without having to untie any knots.  The globule-of-globules-of-globules ordering of the material recalls those beautiful fractal patterns in geometry that keep repeating a design all the way down.    A paper in Science suggested that this is how DNA is organized in the nucleus.1  DNA appears to be folded into “fractal globules” possessing a hierarchical organization.  Lieberman-Aiden et al explained:Various authors have proposed that chromosomal regions can be modeled as an “equilibrium globule”: a compact, densely knotted configuration originally used to describe a polymer in a poor solvent at equilibrium…. Grosberg et al. proposed an alternative model, theorizing that polymers, including interphase DNA, can self-organize into a long-lived, nonequilibrium conformation that they described as a “fractal globule”.  This highly compact state is formed by an unentangled polymer when it crumples into a series of small globules in a “beads-on-a-string” configuration.  These beads serve as monomers in subsequent rounds of spontaneous crumpling until only a single globule-of-globules-of-globules remains.  The resulting structure resembles a Peano curve, a continuous fractal trajectory that densely fills 3D space without crossing itself.  Fractal globules are an attractive structure for chromatin segments because they lack knots and would facilitate unfolding and refolding, for example, during gene activation, gene repression, or the cell cycle.  In a fractal globule, contiguous regions of the genome tend to form spatial sectors whose size corresponds to the length of the original region (Fig. 4C).  In contrast, an equilibrium globule is highly knotted and lacks such sectors; instead, linear and spatial positions are largely decorrelated after, at most, a few megabases (Fig. 4C).  The fractal globule has not previously been observed.At resolutions currently available, it was not possible to prove that DNA is organized in fractal globules: “We conclude that, at the scale of several megabases, the data are consistent with a fractal globule model for chromatin organization,” they said, adding: “Of course, we cannot rule out the possibility that other forms of regular organization might lead to similar findings.”  Measurements so far, however, are consistent with the fractal model and inconsistent with the equilibrium-globule model.  Their computational methods “confirm the presence of chromosome territories and the spatial proximity of small, gene-rich chromosomes,” they said.  This points to “an additional level of genome organization that is characterized by the spatial segregation of open and closed chromatin to form two genome-wide compartments.”  This is what is consistent with the “fractal globule, a knot-free, polymer conformation that enables maximally dense packing while preserving the ability to easily fold and unfold any genomic locus.”1.  Lieberman-Aiden et al, “Comprehensive Mapping of Long-Range Interactions Reveals Folding Principles of the Human Genome,” Science, 9 October 2009: Vol. 326. no. 5950, pp. 289-293, DOI: 10.1126/science.1181369.This is amazing and wonderful to consider.  Not only does DNA contain a vast library of genetic instructions, it is organized in a way that maximizes both packing and accessibility.  There are molecular machines that “know” how to pack DNA this way, but they themselves were coded in DNA.  The whole system is mechanized, optimized and integrated in levels we are only beginning to understand.  There was no mention of evolution in this paper (obviously).(Visited 117 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more


Ethical buying power: Coffee, chocolate and Fairtrade

first_imgFairtrade is a common-good philosophy that aids better trading conditions for producers and the export of their products (particularly in Africa). In addition, it promotes sustainability associated with trade and in the manufacturing sector. It works by holding both manufacturer and consumer to higher social and environmental standards. While most (96%) Fairtrade products are agricultural goods, such as coffee, cocoa, bananas, cotton, sugar and flowers, others with Fairtrade certification include clothing, cosmetics, gold and consumable goods, such as soft drinks, wine and ice cream. (Image: Creative Commons)• Cadbury Fairtrade choc now in South Africa• Projects aim to empower women in agriculture• Africa dismantling trade barriers • Africa has huge growth potential for e-commerce CD AndersonWhat is Fairtrade? Fairtrade is a non-governmental organisation that sources and co-ordinates the ethical certification of products and their producers. It is aimed at promoting equality and sustainability in farming sectors in the developing world, including Africa, Middle East and South America.Dating back to the 1960s, Fairtrade began with small initiatives by individuals and communities who wanted to make a difference in developing countries. They sought to buy their products in an ethical manner, through paying fair prices, establishing direct trading partnerships with these producers and sharing knowledge and information on production, market and quality requirements.In the 21st century, the Fairtrade philosophy has become a worldwide trend, with Fairtrade practices on every continent, in all regions.Fairtrade is finding traction in Africa and South Africa, where support for local farmers and small-scale is a meaningful contributor to employment and the economy. Throughout the process, from the labour used to manufacture the products, the contents of the products and the selling mechanisms used to market the final product, Fairtrade promotes the equality and sustainability of small-scale agriculture, trade and manufacturing.Infographic by Sifiso Nkabinde What products are Fairtrade? A product that carries the Fairtrade certification stamp has met the organisation’s rigorous standards. These insist that profits from the sale of Fairtrade goods must be worked back to producers and farmers to improve labour conditions, promote sustainable, environmentally friendly farming and manufacturing techniques, and invest back into the business and its people.While most (96%) Fairtrade products are agricultural goods, such as coffee, cocoa, bananas, cotton, sugar and flowers, they include clothing, cosmetics and beauty products, gold and consumable goods, such as soft drinks, wine and ice cream.Popular companies that produce or use Fairtrade products in their manufacturing include American ice cream company Ben & Jerry’s, chocolatier Cadbury’s and over 100 global clothing retailers. In South Africa, Fairtrade products made locally and from Africa include Ciro coffee, Cadbury’s and several established and emerging wine farms, including Fairvalley, House of Mandela and Palesa. Fairtrade products are available from Woolworths – one of Brand South Africa’s 2015 Top 10 Most Valuable Brands – selected specialist food stores and some larger retail supermarkets.Fairtrade quick facts • More than half the bananas sold in Switzerland are products of Fairtrade.• A quarter of all flowers sold in Germany are sourced by Fairtrade.• While the hallmark of Fairtrade has been the export from source country to another region, over the last four years there has been an increase in domestic sales, keeping the Fairtrade cycle local.• Demand for Fairtrade products is growing exponentially in Brazil, India and Kenya.Source: Fairtrade South Africa The business of Fairtrade: the triple bottom line Fairtrade is based on the non-traditional commercial framework of the triple bottom line. Unlike the more traditional profit or loss bottom line, it looks at three levels of impact of products manufactured, marketed and sold: social, environmental and financial.Simply, Fairtrade focuses on items that prioritise the people behind the product, followed by the positive impact the manufacture and consumption of the product has on the environment, and then on whether a profit is made from the product.In South Africa, the triple bottom line means that what is produced from the business, goes back into the operation at all levels. Profits are used to attend to the educational and social needs of the workers: schooling, housing, social awareness, health and welfare. This, in turn, leads to more sustained job creation and employment security.This philosophy falls in line with the ideals of South Africa’s National Development Plan, particularly in the areas of social cohesion, creating more inclusive economies and encouraging active citizenry.  Infographic by Sifiso Nkabindelast_img read more