Board right not to back more spending

first_img1) To change the position of director of operations, which served the entire town, to a secretarial position that serves only her, with an appointee who called for the position’s abolition when that person ran for town office in 2015.2) To add the additional position of bookkeeper to the supervisor, which would have increased town spending while exclusively serving her, even though the town already has a comptroller and three bookkeepers, while she ran for office claiming to be a financial and budget expert.3) To increase the salary of the deputy supervisor from $1,000 to more than $10,000, despite having stated in January her deputy would be a “volunteer,” since he’s already collecting a lucrative town pension.That’s it. Three proposals, all of which involve spending taxpayer money on partisan appointments meant to reward the people who helped get her elected. If blocking these expenses are “indications of not supporting the supervisor,” then bravo to our town board. Keep up the good work.Ginger LaChapelleNiskayunaMore from The Daily Gazette:Niskayuna girls’ cross country wins over BethlehemEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?Puccioni’s two goals help Niskayuna boys’ soccer top Shaker, remain perfect I read with interest the May 14 letter “Town, school need new tax attitude,” by retired school district administrator Brian Kreis. The piece contained the same old tired criticism that has been repeatedly proven untrue about the Niskayuna Town Board blocking the new supervisor’s attempts to reform town government. It even goes so far as to complain because one of the town board members pledged to maintain the quality of life in Niskayuna.I’m unsure of the former school administrator’s point. Is he advocating for a decreased quality of life in Niskayuna, or is he trying to lead Gazette readers to believe that the new supervisor is actually putting forward reform proposals that are being blocked?I’ve been present for, or watched on television, every town board meeting since January. I encourage Niskayuna taxpayers who haven’t had this opportunity to request the minutes of these minutes for their own information. To date, the supervisor has put forward only three proposals: Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img read more


Letter: Thank you to man, students who came to aid in Scotia

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionOn the morning of February 13, I was running errands in Scotia. I happened to get stuck in a driveway. A kind gentleman stopped to assist. Soon, two students who were walking to school also stopped to help. The two students caught the attention of two more students who were walking to school and they joined in the effort. Soon my car was unstuck.Thank you to this gentleman and these four students for taking time to assist. I appreciate the service these five unknown persons rendered to me.Marilyn J. SmithJohnstownMore Letters to the Editor: Sunday, March 17More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationlast_img read more


Retail – Building towards the future

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Channel hopping

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Creston turns up heat in council row

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Surrey offices: House arrest

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Ballymore chops 12 floors off Millharbour tower plans

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Lease experts prove their worth

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Widows to bowl out of Plymouth’s Drake Circus

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Rupiah inches closer to 15,000 over fears of COVID-19 pandemic

first_imgThe rupiah inched closer to the Rp 15,000 psychological mark against the US dollar on Monday, as fears over the COVID-19 pandemic prompted investors to dump risky assets amid a global market rout.The rupiah depreciated 1.05 percent to 14,932 against the greenback as of 3:59 p.m. Jakarta time, Bloomberg data shows.According to Bank Indonesia (BI), the local currency weakened 0.02 percent to 14,818 against the dollar on the Jakarta Interbank Spot Dollar Rate (JISDOR). Read also: ‘Triple market intervention’: BI buys bonds, rupiah to prop up prices amid viral routIndonesia has so far announced 117 confirmed COVID-19 cases, with five deaths. Globally, the pneumonia-like illness has infected more than 169,000 people and taken at least 6,500 lives.Last week, BI revealed foreign outflows of around Rp 31.76 trillion in government bonds and Rp 4.87 trillion in Indonesian shares since January, as investors flee to safe-haven assets. The central bank has bought Rp 130 trillion in government debt papers since January, of which around Rp 110 trillion has been spent since COVID-19 spread outside China in late January.“We are committed to remaining in the market to stabilize the rupiah by selling dollars as cash or domestic non-deliverables forward,” BI Governor Perry Warjiyo said recently.Topics : The rupiah has fallen 3.7 percent in the past week, the worst in the region after the Malaysian ringgit, which fell almost 3 percent.The yield on 10-year government bonds grew 7 percentage points on Monday from the previous day’s figure, indicating a drop in price to 97,767. Meanwhile, the Jakarta Composite Index (JCI) slumped 4.42 percent on Monday’s closing despite foreign investors buying a net Rp 238.11 billion (US$15.83 million).The drop in Indonesian equities follows the continued rout on Asian markets during Monday trading, with Tokyo dropping 2.46 percent, Hong Kong 4.03 percent and Singapore 5.25 percent.“The rupiah will be traded lower at around 14,940 to 14,500 per US dollar tomorrow [Tuesday],” said futures firm PT Garuda Berjangka president director Ibrahim.last_img read more